Second Place: Buckley College Essay Contest

By: Bernard Stanford The following essay was the second-place winner of the Buckley Program’s spring semester essay contest. The topic was “What can we learn from William F. Buckley, Jr. today?”.  Yale today has a delicate relationship with the concept of “namesakes.” On a university filled nearly to bursting with names (such that poor Messrs. Sterling,... Continue Reading →

First Place: Buckley Program College Essay Contest

By: Zach Young The following essay was the winner of the Buckley Program's spring semester essay contest. The topic was "What can we learn from William F. Buckley, Jr. today?".  “The best defense against usurpatory government is an assertive citizenry.” - William F. Buckley, Jr. Upon exiting the 1787 Constitutional Convention, Benjamin Franklin purportedly encountered an... Continue Reading →

Interview with Dr. Sally Satel, resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and lecturer at Yale School of Medicine

By: Rob Henderson This interview with Dr. Sally Satel was conducted before her discussion at the Buckley Program’s dinner seminar on Wednesday, April 5th. This transcript has been condensed and lightly edited from a longer interview. Dr. Sally Satel is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and the staff psychiatrist at a methadone... Continue Reading →

Suicide of The West

Editors’ note: Last fall, the Buckley Program sponsored an essay contest open to student Fellows and others within the Yale community. The topic, tied to our annual conference, was James Burnham’s 1964 book, Suicide of the West. Judged by three Yale professors, the following essay was written by Theresa Oei, member of the Class of 2015 and a... Continue Reading →

Beyond Economic Education

Editors’ note: Last fall, the Buckley Program sponsored an essay contest open to student Fellows and others within the Yale community. The topic, tied to our annual conference, was James Burnham’s 1964 book, Suicide of the West. Judged by three Yale professors, the following essay was written by Thomas Hopson, a Buckley Fellow and rising senior in... Continue Reading →

Liberalism and Death of a Diverse Education

Editors’ note: Last fall, the Buckley Program sponsored an essay contest open to student Fellows and others within the Yale community. The topic, tied to our annual conference, was James Burnham's 1964 book, Suicide of the West. Judged by three Yale professors, the following essay was written by Adrianne Elliott, a Buckley Fellow and rising senior in... Continue Reading →

Reflections on Christina Hoff Sommers

The Buckley Program's recent guest speaker, Christina Hoff Sommers, gave a lecture on her vision for "freedom" feminism, and sparked an important conversation around campus about feminism and women's rights. In the hopes of providing a small snapshot of this reaction, The Beacon features both an opinion piece of a current Buckley fellow, Karina Kovalcik, and... Continue Reading →

On the Poverty Conference: Part II

This is the second post in a three part series aimed at summarizing some of the arguments made at Notre Dame during the Center for Ethics and Culture’s 15th annual conference, this year on poverty. You can read my first post here. In the following post, I’d like to elaborate on the ways in which we are all called in our own vocations to participate in solutions to material and spiritual poverty.

On the Poverty Conference: Part I

Child poverty is not all about the money. It is about parenting, love, and engagement with the child. Children growing up in rough, dangerous neighborhoods often do grow up to live middle class lives and better. The cycle of poverty is perpetuated not by material poverty but by a poverty of spirit or love. Heckman argued that the real solution to poverty must involve interventions that promote the dignity and agency of human beings by fostering skills and habits in children.

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